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June 14, 2017 | News

TARA Biosystems Named Red Herring Top 100 of 2017

June 14, 2017. Red Herring has announced the winners of its Top 100 North America 2017 event, held this week in Los Angeles. The winning companies, selected from thousands of prospective startups and tech firms, represent the cutting edge of North America’s world-class technology industry–and demonstrate the region’s continued reputation …

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June 14, 2017. Red Herring has announced the winners of its Top 100 North America 2017 event, held this week in Los Angeles. The winning companies, selected from thousands of prospective startups and tech firms, represent the cutting edge of North America’s world-class technology industry–and demonstrate the region’s continued reputation for digital excellence.

The Top 100 awards were handed out at a special ceremony tonight at the Marina Del Rey Marriott Hotel, where for the past two days companies’ executives have presented their companies to a judging panel comprising industry insiders, analysts and journalists. Entrants also enjoyed a host of keynote speeches and panel discussions featuring some of North America’s top technology leaders.

“This is one of the most innovative and exciting groups of companies we’ve ever hosted at a Top 100 awards show,” said Alex Vieux, chairman of Red Herring. “It’s always a pleasure to come to California and see the cream of North America’s tech crop. 2017 has proven to be another fine year for tech, which is now simply the economy rather than a small part of it.”

Finalist companies operate in all aspects of the tech industry, from fintech and IoT to robotics, security and clean technology. It was a particularly good year for cybersecurity platforms, whose market has diversified and expanded amid technical breakthroughs, and hacks that have made headlines around the world.

“The fact that so many companies here are working at the bleeding edge of tech, goes to show just how fast this sector is moving,” said Vieux. “I’m proud to see so many exciting entrepreneurs at this awards ceremony, and have no doubt they will go on to achieve great things.”

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April 18, 2017 | News

Thirteen startups join Springboard’s Health Innovation Hub

April 18, 2017.   A new batch of 13 women-led life science and healthcare startups have been accepted into Springboard Enterprises’ Health Innovation Hub, a year-long program for growth-stage companies preparing to expand and raise funds for new product development. It’s an opportunity for guidance, networking, and access to new …

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April 18, 2017.  

A new batch of 13 women-led life science and healthcare startups have been accepted into Springboard Enterprises’ Health Innovation Hub, a year-long program for growth-stage companies preparing to expand and raise funds for new product development.

It’s an opportunity for guidance, networking, and access to new resources. The program also aids visibility as the companies gain a foothold in their respective industries. For Geeta Singh of MAG Optics, acceptance into the new Health Innovation Hub class came at an ideal time.

“We recently began to tell our story at various Med/Biotech conferences and startup challenges,” explained Singh via email. “We have to approach it judiciously and strategically and, frankly, we need a little guidance on how to navigate our story. The powerhouse network, the breadth and depth of industry and domain experts as well as Springboard’s rigorous program couldn’t have presented at a more perfect time.”

Springboard has a solid track record of success. Over 17 years, the non-profit has supported 669 women leaders globally, from companies that have now raised a combined $7.5 billion. Four out of five of those startups are still in business today.

Here’s an overview of the 2017 class that will be formally welcomed at a networking event in Boston on Tuesday night.
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April 17, 2017 | News

TARA Biosystems Founder Appointed University Professor

April 17, 2017. Gordana Vunjak-Novakovic, PhD, the Mikati Foundation Professor of Biomedical Engineering, professor of medical sciences at P&S, and director of Columbia’s Laboratory for Stem Cells and Tissue Engineering at CUMC, has been appointed a University Professor, Columbia University’s highest academic honor. The medical center now has five faculty …

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April 17, 2017. Gordana Vunjak-Novakovic, PhD, the Mikati Foundation Professor of Biomedical Engineering, professor of medical sciences at P&S, and director of Columbia’s Laboratory for Stem Cells and Tissue Engineering at CUMC, has been appointed a University Professor, Columbia University’s highest academic honor. The medical center now has five faculty members who are University Professors.

The professorships are granted to members of the faculty in recognition of exceptional scholarly merit and distinguished service to Columbia. Dr. Vunjak-Novakovic has been a pioneer in the engineering of functional human tissue for use in regenerative medicine. Together with her research team, she has been able to engineer cardiac tissue by culturing stem cells and to grow bone grafts for facial reconstruction surgery. Her discoveries have led to new approaches for treating injuries and complex diseases and have supported the development and evaluation of therapeutic drugs.

“The impact of Professor Vunjak-Novakovic’s discoveries on society and human health provides only a partial account of Professor Vunjak-Novakovic’s many contributions to this institution, higher education, and the world beyond,” said President Lee C. Bollinger in announcing the appointment.

Dr. Vunjak-Novakovic completed her PhD in chemical engineering at the University of Belgrade and relocated to the United States after receiving a Fulbright Fellowship. She is the founder of three public-spirited biotechnology companies, the first woman engineer to deliver the Director’s Lecture at the National Institutes of Health, and the first of Columbia’s female faculty members to be elected to the National Academy of Engineering.
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December 7, 2016 | News

New York City’s Burgeoning Biotech Industry

December 7, 2016. New buildings on the East Side of Manhattan are signs of life of the city’s foray into a new economy, its burgeoning biotech industry. NY1’s Erin Billups filed the following report. New York is known for many things. The biotech industry is not one of them. But …

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December 7, 2016. New buildings on the East Side of Manhattan are signs of life of the city’s foray into a new economy, its burgeoning biotech industry. NY1’s Erin Billups filed the following report.

New York is known for many things. The biotech industry is not one of them. But that is changing.

“Six years ago, there was nothing here. Now, we have over 1,500 people at the center working hand in hand with the academic and medical centers,” says John Cunningham, senior vice president of Alexandria Real Estate Equities.

The new Alexandria Life Sciences Center sits between NYU Langone Medical Center and Bellevue Hospital on East 29th Street, visible from the FDR Drive.

It is the result of a project led by Mayor Michael Bloomberg that broke ground in 2007 to grow the biotech industry around one of America’s most robust academic medical corridors.

“The academic and medical centers in New York produce the greatest amount of medical discoveries and scientific discoveries of any centers in the world,” Cunningham says.

Roche and Eli Lilly are some of the big Pharma names among its 25 tenants. The two 17-story buildings also house startups like Kallyope, the brainchild of three top Columbia University scientists. They are developing therapies around the gut-brain connection.

“We’ve been very fortunate to be able to recruit from many of the great institutions around here, but we’ve also been able to recruit from Copenhagen, United Kingdom, San Francisco, Boston because there are a number of people who just, they like our mission, but they also want to be in New York City,” says Dr. Nancy Thornberry, CEO of Kallyope.

The center’s Launch Labs will rent space for just $1,900 a month and provide grants to potential startups.

Tara Biosystems is a fledgling firm just taking flight with its cardiac tissue technology.

“On our floor alone, there’s at least seven small companies growing and trying to get their companies off the ground, and so there’s a great community of collaboration and help,” siys Misti Ushio, CEO of Tara Biosystems.
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November 14, 2016 | News

BBC World News Interviews TARA Biosystems Founder

November 14, 2016. Need a new body part? New blood? New bone, new heart? Well in the future you may be able to order one. Scientists and technologists are working towards a bio-engineered future where new tissues and new organs could be made to order. We are looking at the …

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November 14, 2016. Need a new body part? New blood? New bone, new heart? Well in the future you may be able to order one. Scientists and technologists are working towards a bio-engineered future where new tissues and new organs could be made to order.
We are looking at the start of a new science, which could create parts of a person in a petri dish.
This is a quantum step from organ replacement. This is about seeing our bodies differently and being able to replace the mechanisms of our being whenever we need to.
Some years ago I met Ray Kurzwell, one of the world’s most famous futurologists and credited with a number of significant inventions including the flat bed scanner and the first text to voice machine. In an interview I did with him, we were talking about how life spans are getting longer. I asked him whether he ever felt man could live for ever – “indefinitely” he said.
It was quite a claim – made even more surreal by the fact he almost dropped the line nonchantly into conversation. But the technology we are seeing being deceloped in this programme, does take us on the road to indefinite lives.
If you really want to, you can keen an old car going as long as you want. You just keep replacing the parts. At some point it becomes too expensive to bother but if we were talking about our on life, at what point would we not bother? If the technology existed to continually replace work out parts, could we not keep going indefinitely?
In a lab in a rather run-down part of Brooklyn in New York, amid shopping cart pushing rough characters and the sort of empty streets you think twice about walkijg down alone, is a lab which is part of the drive to develop this indefinite future.
They are making bones without bodies. Nina Tandon is the co-founder of Epibone. Sitting in her lab she told me “Well we’re hoping to disrupt the world of skeletal reconstruction and reinvent it by harnessing the power of our own cells to repair the body. Really there’s really no better replacement for you than you yourself.”
They are doing that by taking some animal bone and stripping it of its cells so it won’t be rejected by the body. That leaves it as a blank neutral canvas. Then the matrix of bone mineral, collagen and protein is shaped using the CT scan to form a scaffold, the support needed by cells to grow. The scaffold is then seeded with stem cells derived from a patient’s own body. These are capable of developing into many different tissues, including bone. So effectively they can take an animal bone, spread it with a bit of your cells which then turn it into a piece of your bone. They can then implant the bone into a body which sees it as part of itself.
At the moment they are testing this on very small bones in the lab, but it’s not a far stretch to see this developing into a science and technology that could help people replace worn out bones and joints.
Across the Atlantic, in the UK in an equally unimpressive building on a light trading estate in the UK is a company called Tissue Regenix, which is working on a technology that could replace people’s tendons.
The principle is the same as the one being used to grow bones. The bio-scaffolds are made from chemically treated animal tendons prepared under sterile conditions at their lab in the north of England.
Essentially the tendons come straight from the abattoir and are then inspected for any gross damage. They then g through a process called decellurisation which consists of a number of washes, each with a purpose, from removing living cells to killing bugs. So they are getting rid of any DNA basically, any contaminants, any bacteria, any fats. Just like Epibone, this company is manufacturing bio-scaffolds, on which a patient’s own cells will grow.
Not only can this technology be applied to tendons but also to heart valves and skin. The aim is to repair wounds, and diseased or worn out body parts.
People are living longer now. Kids born today could well live to be 100 years old. And unfortunately, your body was not designed to last to 100 years old. So things wear out and need replacing.
Regenerative medicine could be incredibly important in the future. It enables people to actually have a long-lasting, regenerative, maybe permanent repair to these problems that occur as you age or just carry on through life.
If you had to point to one piece of technology that could genuinely change the nature of what it is to be human, the science of regenerative medicine, could well be one to look at.
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June 22, 2016 | News

TARA Biosystems Appoints Robert Langer to Board of Directors

June 22, 2016. NEW YORK–(BUSINESS WIRE)–TARA Biosystems, Inc., a company developing physiologically relevant “heart-on-a-chip” tissue models for both toxicology and drug discovery applications, announced today that it has appointed biotechnology entrepreneur, scientist and engineer Robert S. Langer, Ph.D., to its board of directors. read more TARA Biosystems offers testing services …

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June 22, 2016. NEW YORK–(BUSINESS WIRE)–TARA Biosystems, Inc., a company developing physiologically relevant “heart-on-a-chip” tissue models for both toxicology and drug discovery applications, announced today that it has appointed biotechnology entrepreneur, scientist and engineer Robert S. Langer, Ph.D., to its board of directors.
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TARA Biosystems offers testing services on its human stem cell-derived cardiac tissue platform. The company’s platform, which is based on its proprietary Biowire™ technology, enables discovery efforts for novel heart medicines via its disease modeling and phenotypic screening capabilities. The Biowire technology is based on research from the laboratories of scientific co-founders Gordana Vunjak-Novakovic, Ph.D., the Mikati Foundation Professor of Biomedical Engineering and Medical Sciences at Columbia University, and Milica Radisic, Ph.D., P.Eng., Professor and Canada Research Chair in Functional Cardiovascular Tissue Engineering at the University of Toronto. Drs. Vunjak-Novakovic and Radisic are both world leaders in cardiac tissue engineering and former members of Dr. Langer’s lab at Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT).

World-Renowned Biomedical Engineer Robert Langer Appointed to Board of Directors

Dr. Langer is the David H. Koch Institute Professor at MIT. A founder of more than 30 life science companies and the most cited engineer in the world, Dr. Langer’s patents have been licensed or sublicensed to more than 300 pharmaceutical, chemical, biotechnology and medical device companies. He served as chairman of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration’s Science Board from 1999 to 2002, and is one of very few individuals elected to the National Academy of Medicine, the National Academy of Engineering, the National Academy of Sciences and the National Academy of Inventors. Dr. Langer is the recipient of numerous awards and recognitions, including the 2015 Queen Elizabeth Prize for Engineering; the 2014 Kyoto Prize; the 2013 Wolf Prize in Chemistry; the 2012 Priestley Medal, the American Chemical Society’s highest honor; the 2011 National Medal of Technology and Innovation; the 2008 Millennium Prize; the 2006 National Medal of Science; the 2005 Albany Medical Center Prize; the 2002 Charles Stark Draper Prize, considered the equivalent of the Nobel Prize for engineers; and the 1998 Lemelson-MIT Prize for being one of history’s most prolific inventors in medicine. He is also the only engineer to receive the Gairdner Foundation International Award. He holds 28 honorary doctorates including honorary degrees from Harvard and Yale.

“Through its cutting-edge, cardiac tissue engineering technology, TARA Biosystems has rapidly demonstrated promise to improve the efficiency of the drug development process and accelerate patients’ access to innovative therapies,” said Dr. Langer. “I look forward to working with the company through this exciting phase of growth.”

“Professor Langer brings a deep history in collaborating with our scientific co-founders, Drs. Vunjak-Novakovic and Radisic, through their early work on cardiac tissue engineering in his lab, and it is a privilege to have him join our board,” said Misti Ushio, Ph.D., CEO of TARA Biosystems. “His unique experience, from basic research to product launch, will be invaluable to TARA as we continue to validate and commercialize our unique predictive technology to test the safety and efficacy of new therapies and for the discovery of new drugs.”

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April 28, 2016 | News

Interview with Founder of TARA Biosystems.

April 28, 2016. biomedical engineering postdocs who trick skin cells into becoming stem cells, from which tissue engineers grow miniature versions of human organs that can safely screen new drugs and treat diseases. Think: organ on a chip. read more

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April 28, 2016. biomedical engineering postdocs who trick skin cells into becoming stem cells, from which tissue engineers grow miniature versions of human organs that can safely screen new drugs and treat diseases. Think: organ on a chip.
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January 5, 2016 | News

TARA Biosystems Raises Seed Funding

NEW YORK, Jan. 05, 2016 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — TARA Biosystems, Inc., which provides physiologically-relevant “heart-on-a-chip” tissue models for both toxicology and drug discovery applications, raised $2.25 million in a seed financing to build commercial operations in New York City. Based on research from the laboratories of Columbia University Professor Gordana …

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NEW YORK, Jan. 05, 2016 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — TARA Biosystems, Inc., which provides physiologically-relevant “heart-on-a-chip” tissue models for both toxicology and drug discovery applications, raised $2.25 million in a seed financing to build commercial operations in New York City. Based on research from the laboratories of Columbia University Professor Gordana Vunjak-Novakovic and University of Toronto Professor Milica Radisic, both scientific co-founders of TARA Biosystems, the company aims to capitalize on the need for more predictive technology for testing the safety and efficacy of new therapies and for the discovery of new drug compounds.

Harris & Harris Group led the financing with participation from the Partnership Fund for New York City and Alexandria Venture Investments. “We are fortunate to be funded by investors committed to NYC,” said Dr. Misti Ushio, founding CEO of TARA Biosystems and Managing Director of Harris & Harris Group. “With this investment, we will build our commercial operations in NYC and are enthusiastic to be a part of its growing life science community.”

“Growing the life sciences sector in New York City has been a top priority of the Partnership Fund, with a recent focus on supporting the spin-out of life sciences companies from New York’s world-class universities,” said Maria Gotsch, President and CEO of the Partnership Fund for New York City. “It is a priority for us to create new jobs here in New York City. TARA Biosystems and its ground-breaking predictive technology will be an excellent addition to the growing life sciences ecosystem in New York.”

TARA Biosystems offers testing services on its human stem cell-derived cardiac tissue platform, which is based on its proprietary, patented Biowire™ technology. Professor Milica Radisic said, “We are actively working with our collaborators in the pharmaceutical industry to commercialize the TARA technology and fulfill the industry need for predictive human cardiac safety and efficacy information much earlier in the development cycle for new medicines.”

TARA Biosystems also enables discovery efforts for novel heart medicines via its disease modeling and phenotypic screening capabilities. Professor Gordana Vunjak-Novakovic added, “The TARA tissue also has the potential to generate new drug targets for the treatment of cardiac disease because of its ability to recapitulate adult heart biology.”

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Contact

As a result, currently 8 out of 9 drugs tested for cardiotoxicity fail in clinical trials, after spending significant time.

TARA
430 East 29th Street
Suite #1015
New York, NY 10016
USA
info@tarabiosystems.com